Peter Case (SideBar Music Room)

Thu, Sep 12 2013, 8:30pm - $15 - Tickets

Peter Case is a three time Grammy nominee for his work as a singer-songwriter, guitarist and producer (his 2007 solo album, Let Us Now Praise Sleepy John, was among those named in the Best Contemporary Folk category). He has recorded more than a dozen solo records for the Geffen, Vanguard and Yep Roc labels. He is the author of several books as well as a sought-after record producer. Peter’s songs have been covered by artists as diverse as Dave Alvin, Chris Smither, Alejandro Escovedo, Marshall Crenshaw, the Goo Goo Dolls, the Go-Go's, and many others.

Riding the rails from Buffalo to California while still a teenager, Case performed as a street musician in San Francisco before joining Jack Lee and Paul Collins to form The Nerves. The groups single, Hanging on the Telephone, would later become a Top 10 hit for Blondie. Case then moved to LA and formed The Plimsouls. The group landed a deal with Geffen on the strength of the hit song, A Million Miles Away, which they performed in the movie Valley Girl. 

Case has been a solo performer since the late '80s. His albums include his T-Bone Burnett-produced Grammy-nominated solo debut; the widely acclaimed The Man With the Blue Post Modern Fragmented Neo-Traditionalist Guitar, (featuring the signature songs Entella Hotel, Two Angels, and Put Down The Gun); the self-released acoustic blues album Peter Case Sings Like Hell; the Grammy-nominated Let Us Now Praise Sleepy John and a collection of unreleased and alternate tracks, The Case Files. Also recently released was Beach Town Confidential, a previously unreleased live recording of a 1983 Plimsouls show in front of a rowdy, appreciative crowd at the Golden Bear in Huntington Beach, CA.

Case is the central figure in the feature-length documentary Troubadour Blues by Pennsylvania filmmaker Tom Weber, released in 2011. The film also featuring Dave Alvin, Mary Gauthier and many other fine singer-songwriters, is an honest and intimate look at the lives of modern-day wandering minstrels.

 

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